If you think you can jilt me, or in some way set me aside, I tel you now, you have given me the power to destroy you, and don’t think I won’t use it. I want to be a good husband and for you to be happy. But don’t ever cross me. Do you understand? Never.

Fit and Proper
The “Court Circular” - a daily report of the royal family’s comings and goings - has been printed in British newspapers since 1803.

Thomas: You’ve got to speculate to accumulate. Hadn’t you heard?
O’Brien: No. But I know the one about neither a borrower nor a lender.

Culture and Customs:
Before women adopted modern, shorter hairstyles of he 1920s, they had to put plenty of effort into maintaining their flowing locks and complicated updos. (Or, rather, their servants would have had to do so.) To keep the hair in place for elaborate styles, a pomade could be made by melting castor oil, lard, wax, and fragrant oils. And an old-time method for cleaning hair involved a mixture of glycerine, spirit of rosemary and water.

Branson: I’d wait forever.
Sybil: I’m not asking for forever. Just a few more weeks.


Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Downton Abbey Rewatch + 3x06

Thomas: Your ladyship, may I have the honor of this dance?
Violet: Yes, it is a waltz. I’m far too old for that awful Foxtrot.
Thomas: What about the Black Bottom, m’lady?

The Black Bottom was a racy flapper dance that mimicked spanking. The dance became popular after it appeared in the 1924 Irving Berlin musical Dinah and in the 1926 show Scandals of 1926. The dance even inspired songs like Jelly Roll Morton’s “Black Bottom Stomp”

Mr. Bates: I have business in London.
Miss O’Brien: Oh, yes? Well, judging by your expression, your business doesn’t seem to be prospering.
Anna: The trick of business is to mind your own.

Culture and Customs: The planchette - what Americans know as a Ouija board - had been all the rage in the 1860s, a craze that many trace to the sentimental story of the Fox sisters, American siblings who were known for communing with the dead. Models in various materials and sizes were available, as well as charts that allowed the pointers to pick out fortunes and messages, not just letters. The name-brand Ouija was patented in 1891 by the Kennard Novelty Company of Baltimore.

Matthew: If I thought for a moment that I was an argument against your marriage, I should jump into the nearest river.
Mary: And how would you manage that without my help?
Matthew: Well, I’d get you to push me in.